Episode 105

Huck Cycles

Meet Brett McCoy

by | Apr 28, 2022

Show Notes:

You know, if there’s anything I love more than an intentional business that starts in a garage, it’s an unintentional business that starts in a garage. How about an idea so innovative that it hardly requires a sales and marketing department. That’s exactly what happened at Huck Cycles, a local small business founded right at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. A story of grassroots entrepreneurship in every possible way, and a business that has exceeded all expectations – even those of Brett McCoy, the founder of Huck Cycles. This has to be one of the coolest stories we’ve shared on the podcast – you’re going to love it.

Huck Cycles

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Transcript:

Narrator
Welcome to The Best of LKN, a podcast featuring the best small businesses and the most influential professionals around Lake Norman, North Carolina. Each week, we spotlight those businesses and individuals that are making a positive impact here in the Lake Norman area. Thanks for joining us, enjoy the show.

Jeff
Hey, Lake Norman, welcome back to the podcast. You know, if there’s anything I love more than an intentional business that starts in a garage, it’s an unintentional business that starts in a garage. An idea is so innovative that it hardly requires a sales and marketing department. That’s exactly what happened at Huck Cycles, a local small business founded right at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. A story of grassroots entrepreneurship in every possible way and a business that has exceeded all expectations, even those of Brett McCoy, the founder of Huck Cycles. This has to be one of the coolest stories we’ve shared on the podcast, you’re going to love it. But first, I have an announcement. I’m super excited to share the news that we’ve signed another sponsor for The Best of LKN platform. John Hassell is the agency manager at Farm Bureau Insurance in Huntersville, and he joins The Best of LKN as our eighth sponsor and brand partner. We’ll have John on the podcast soon for an interview and to learn more about his career and the services he provides his clients. In the meantime, you can find a direct link to John’s professional profile in the show notes for this episode and in this week’s email newsletter. Huge thanks to John Hassell at Farm Bureau Insurance of North Mecklenburg in Huntersville for supporting The Best of LKN and small businesses throughout our community. You can find information and links to all of our amazing sponsors and brand partners in the show notes for this episode, or on our homepage at thebestoflkn.com. For now, lean in my friends as we share a conversation with the founder of one of the coolest and most successful concepts ever featured on the podcast. You’re listening to the number one small business podcast in the Lake Norman area. Enjoy getting to know the founder of Huck Cycles, Brett McCoy.

Jeff
Brett, welcome to the podcast.

Brett
Thank you. I appreciate you having me.

Jeff
Great to finally meet you in person. Matt Santos at Davidson Provision Company.

Brett
Yes.

Jeff
Big fan of Huck Cycles and keeps asking, you know, when are you having Brett on? I’m like, it’s coming. You know, we got it booked. We got the meeting booked. So, very cool. Your wife is Greta McCoy?

Brett
Yes.

Jeff
Owner of the Bungalow Market in Cornelius, also a guest on the podcast, that was super cool. Loved featuring her business.

Brett
She loved it. Yeah.

Jeff
I appreciate that. That was really cool, meeting her as well. And a super, small business she has too. Like, I love those crafty, you know, just creative small businesses. Very cool.

Brett
She’s got a fun vibe down there. In the shop. Yeah.

Jeff
Well, speaking of creative and crafty small businesses, Huck Cycles is a super innovative and really cool concept. Before we get into Huck Cycles, the work that you’re doing, the motorcycles you’re producing, share with the listeners a little bit of your background, a little bit on Brett McCoy, your prior careers, and the inspiration for founding Huck Cycles.

Brett
Sure. So, I was born and raised in upstate New York. I grew up in a small, very small town. Went to school with 18 to 20 people. It gives you an idea of just how small school the school was. So, I spent my early years on a farm, riding around on dirt bikes and minibikes, and having fun out in the woods and playing around. And when it came time to choose the college path, I decided to go the military route instead of college. So, went off to the army. Spent some time at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, and then deployed overseas for a while, which was a ton of fun. I learned a lot.

Jeff
Where overseas?

Brett
I was in the Middle East for eight months.

Jeff
Yeah, okay. Not like Germany or?

Brett
No, no fun deployment. This was, yeah, a combat deployment. It was great. I learned a lot. I learned a lot about myself during that time, right? Unfortunately, when I was over there, I did get into a little bit of an accident, and I broke my back. So, when I came back to the States, I was going to get out and go law enforcement. But with the broken back injury that was over. So, I explored a path in marketing. And that’s where I spent the majority of my career. So, I’ve worked for direct brand, I worked at various agencies, I’ve owned agencies. I worked as a consulting, at a consulting firm as a strategy and brand consultant for a number of years. And then prior to starting Huck, I was a global head of brand and marketing at Wells Fargo downtown. So, I ran a global position there and worked with teams all over the world. Which was very fun and enjoyable, but it didn’t scratch the creative itch that I have. So, hence Huck.

Jeff
That’s interesting. Now I can nerd out on marketing, like big time. And I wish I had thought of a few different topics for this conversation, because I’d love to, and I may pick your brain a little bit about marketing and brand development, that sort of thing. Very cool. What inspired, why motorcycles? And why electric motorcycles?

Brett
Oh, gosh, that’s a big question. I wish there was this awesome, altruistic explanation that I could give. But it really comes down to one simple thing. So, my wife would not allow me to have a motorcycle. So, I convinced her to let me buy an electric bike. And I did, I bought one. From another brand, very well-respected brand. I got the bike, and it felt too small for me, it didn’t fit the vibe that I was looking for. It didn’t give me the feels that I had when I was growing up riding a dirt bike. So, I sold it and convinced her to let me build my own. And that’s sort of where Huck came from. We never set out for it to be a business. It was going to be build a bike and ride the bike and have fun with the bike. And it turned into, one thing kind of waterfalled into the next. And I started posting pictures of it online, on Instagram and Facebook, and people started reaching out saying, hey, if you finish that one, can you build another one for me? And that went to one person, and then two, and then four and five, and then 10. And when we hit the point where I had all these people giving me money as Brett McCoy to build them bikes, I decided it was time to start a business. So, that’s where I started from. Yeah.

Jeff
Accidental entrepreneur, I love it.

Brett
Accidental entrepreneur, yep.

Jeff
The style of the Huck Cycles is really cool. I’m a cafe racer fan. My last motorcycle was a Harley Davidson. Completely opposite of a cafe racer as a touring bike, but a big fan of the Kawasakis that are modified for, you know, a cafe looks, you know, the 70s era Kawasakis, and the Triumphs and even the BMWs, you know. And so, as soon as I was, you know, looking into Huck Cycles, and I really identified with the style of these cycles, it’s really cool. Was that intentional, like, the style of that bike?

Brett
It was. So, I didn’t have that bike in mind when I set out to build my first. I was, like many people do, scouring the web, looking at images of smaller motorcycles. I was looking at the 100cc and 125cc, and I came across this thread out of Europe of this bike that was the first moped with a top tank. So, they were a smaller bike, they added a top tank to try to get the motorcycle look, but it still fit within the small European styling and laws. And dumb luck, I guess, I found a guy on Instagram who lived in Charlotte. He’s part of the Queen City Moped gang. It’s like 60, 70 people who drive around Charlotte on these really cool, old vintage mopeds. This guy had one, so I reached out to him. And he was nice enough to drive up to our house, bring the bike, and he let me lay it down on a piece of plywood and I traced it. And that became the very first Huck. It was this, you know, giant plywood cutout that I made. And I used that to kind of build off of. So, it was luck that I found a bike that I liked. There happened to be someone in Charlotte with this extremely rare, you know, 1970s styling bike. Just great for me. Yeah.

Jeff
That’s amazing. Where did the fabrication skills come from? Is that something you’ve kind of learned at a young age?

Brett
No, I had no skills. So, fabrication was actually tough. And, you know, I had a piece of wood that I’d cut out and I didn’t know what to do post that. So, I went to different metal shops and fabrication shops in the Lake Norman area. And I’ll be honest, most people laughed at me when I went in and said, hey, can you make this, but make it out of metal. And one of them actually gave me a piece of advice and said, you need to make it out of pipe in some way. So, I went to Lowe’s, and I bought PVC pipe and I took my piece of wood, and I made an entire frame out of PVC pipe. And then I bought wheels and I bought front forks and I bought handlebars and I attached them all to this PVC. And then I took that weird prototype to production shops around the area and said, make this one for me. And most of them laughed at me and said, you know, go, go away. And then I found a guy who works on vintage vehicles, and he does a lot of frame off restorations. And he was stoked about the challenge and said, yeah, let’s do it. So, that’s kind of where it started. And he went and got all the material, and we would go there and work in his shop from like, six o’clock at night till 10, 11 for like months, working on building out various versions of it to get it to where I wanted it.

Jeff
Yeah, I can imagine fabrication shops, especially in the Charlotte, Lake Norman area, are used to, you know, a quarter million-dollar jobs at a time and bigger projects and big ticket stuff.

Brett
Engineers with drawings and CAD files. And here was this weird guy with a PVC cutout. Yeah.

Jeff
Who’s the car restorer, the fabricator that you connected with?

Brett
So, they’re based out of Shelby. I had to go all the way to Shelby to find someone. It was Fabbit Customs is who I was using. We have since moved to another production shop that can handle our volume. And we work with another Lake Norman company based out of Statesville, ABT Metals.

Jeff
Okay, cool. So, let’s talk about Huck Cycles. The process of like, how do you, do stock inventory? Are they build to spec? Custom orders? Like, what’s the process? How do you produce your motorcycles and sell them?

Brett
So, our bikes, gosh, I think, I would like to say there’s a bit more attention behind it. I think we’re starting to get to a place of intention. But historically, it’s been, build what we can build based on the componentry we can get.

Jeff
Yeah.

Brett
We started, you know, the first week of March 2020, selling. And then two weeks later, COVID hit, everything shut down, supply chain was disrupted, trucking, shipping was disrupted, right, everything came to a screeching halt. So, in 2020, as we’re ramping up and growing, we had more orders than we could handle from a production standpoint. We set out and expected to sell maybe 50 to 100 bikes the first year. If we hit 100, I was, you know, lighting candles and fireworks and drinking champagne.

Jeff
Popping champagne, yeah.

Brett
We started in March and by April, we were doing 40, 50 sales a month. And it was all online. It was very unexpected. So, we were behind a lot for the first 12, 14, 16 months. Orders would come in, we’d do our best to fulfill them, order the components, build frames. We finally have gotten to a place now where we’re able to build bikes in advance of an order.

Jeff
Careful what you wish for.

Brett
Yeah, exactly.

Jeff
That’s amazing.

Brett
Too big too fast.

Jeff
Yeah. Are you still doing, what’s the production right now? Like, still like 40, 50?

Brett
So, we can build about 10 to 15 bikes a week right now without sacrificing quality. Everything is built by hand here in Cornelius, currently. And our intention is to keep it within this market as we continue to grow.

Jeff
That’s still amazing. What kind of staff do you have?

Brett
We have 15 full-time employees and one part-timer.

Jeff
Are you hiring?

Brett
We’re always hiring. Always hiring. We will likely need to double our team within the next six months.

Jeff
Yeah, I believe it. Yeah, that’s another topic. The supply chain and labor are two topics we could have completely separate episodes all about that and it’s a challenge. It’s just everything’s such a challenge for small businesses the last couple years.

Brett
Absolutely. Yeah, supply chain, shipping, trucking, logistics, labor. You name it, we’ve hit it in the last two years. Yeah.

Jeff
Can a potential buyer test ride a motorcycle?

Brett
Yes, we love visitors. So, folks are able to come to our shop anytime, Monday through Friday, and check out the production process. Our guys are in there building bikes. So, it’s a fun time to come through and see the process. See how the bikes come in. See how they’re built. See us test ride and then do a demo.

Jeff
Yeah.

Brett
We’re also open on Saturdays for demos only. So, I tend to be in there on Saturdays. And it’s a good opportunity for me to meet people and see them ride and see the smile on the face and spend some time with them.

Jeff
I’ll be stopping by on a Saturday.

Brett
Yes, please do. Come on by.

Jeff
I’m looking forward to it, that’d be awesome. Huck Cycles, where’s the, and we’ll touch on this before we close too, but where’s the best place for listeners and anyone to learn about, to start the process, is it the website?

Brett
It is. I would go to the website, I would also spend some time on our Instagram channel, that’s where we tend to post most of the imagery we get. And a lot of the bikes that we build are built custom to our customers’ specification. So, they all look different. And then when they get their bikes, they mob them out. So, they continue to evolve and look different. And you can see a lot of imagery there.

Jeff
The million-dollar question, Brett. What do the Huck cycles typically cost?

Brett
Sure. So, our bikes start at around $5,400 and they go up from there. I think the highest priced one in our lineup is currently $8,500. That is driven a lot by the fact that we do manufacture and build the frames and a lot of the components here in the US, which is two to three times the cost if we did it overseas. But we’re okay with that. Our customers are okay with that. They’ll pay more for an American-built, fabricated-made products. So, yeah.

Jeff
Absolutely. I mean, coming from a Harley Davidson background, you know, those numbers don’t shock me. And honestly, I’ve been a bicyclist all my life, road and mountain bike. And I mean, you can spend five grand real quick on a pedal bicycle.

Brett
Absolutely, yeah. With gas prices the way they are right, our bikes are all electric. So, there’s three speeds, mode one is like the learning mode, it maxes at 18 miles an hour. Mode two is the legal moped limit, which is the category that our bikes sit in, the moped category where you don’t need a motorcycle license, you can still ride the bike as long as you’re over the age of 16. And then mode three is your off-road play, and that’s the 45 to 50 mile an hour limit. And with a single charge, you’re gonna see 40 to 50 miles of range. So, for most people in this area, and many urban or city environments, 40 miles is more than you’ll do in three or four days. So yeah, it’s a good commuter bike. For a lot of people, it replaces the gas guzzling car.

Jeff
Yeah. Especially if you’re just going to, you know, if you live in the town that you work in, and I know Matt Santos owns a Huck cycle, doesn’t he?

Brett
Yep, he does. I think that’s his primary vehicle.

Jeff
Yeah, I see it. We’re recording at The Hurt Hub in Davidson today. And Matt’s a member here as well. And I see it parked outside quite often. It makes total sense. I mean, he lives in Davidson. Speed limits around Davidson are honestly they’re nothing higher than 35, so you’re well within even mode two for a Huck cycle and makes total sense. I drive a gas guzzling Tundra. So, if I lived and worked in the same town, a Huck cycle would make a lot of sense for me, you know, rather than I mean, around town, I think my truck gets maybe 12 miles a gallon.

Brett
Yes. Yes.

Jeff
That’s awesome. I appreciate you mentioning the specs. That was gonna be my next question. What kind of performance? And what kind of range can someone expect? Very, very cool. What’s the lead time if a customer places an order? How long can they expect to wait, normally? I know it’s always subject to, you know, again, supply chain. But what is the lead time usually?

Brett
So, right now we’re saying three to four weeks. It has been faster. If you ordered a bike today, we’ll probably be shipping it by Wednesday next week. So, we’ve had a week turnaround. But that changes often, right? So, we’re dependent on supply chain coming in and shipping going out. So, our shipping partners who deliver the bikes may not be able to get to us. They may be overloaded or overwhelmed, or driver shortages caused lots of delivery issues. But about a week, right now and four weeks.

Jeff
Tell me where some of your bikes have shipped to. Where, like I would imagine you haven’t sold just locally. I bet you get orders from far off places. Where have you shipped to so far?

Brett
Oh, gosh, that’s a great question. So, we don’t have really a retail presence and have done very little marketing for the company. So, all the growth that we’ve had has been organic via Instagram, Facebook, and our customers sharing their own content, which has driven a sales process unlike anything that I’ve experienced before. So, right now we’re almost at 1000 bikes over the last two years.

Jeff
Wow.

Brett
And I would say less than 20 exist in North Carolina. The rest are spread across the United States. So, we’re in 40 plus states at this point, hundreds of cities. We’ve been fortunate to have bikes shipped all over the world as well. We have a handful in England, we’re in Guam, South Korea. We have a bike in Latvia. And about a month ago, we shipped our first bike all the way to New Zealand, which I believe is now probably the furthest from our shop.

Jeff
I think that’s about as far as you can get.

Brett
Guam might be farther. I haven’t mapped it. Yeah. Yeah. It’s crazy,

Jeff
Depending on which way you go, I guess. East or west.

Brett
Bahamas and all kinds of places.

Jeff
I could see them being huge in the Caribbean and Bermuda. And actually England, of course, with motorcycles are big in England anyway and Europe because of, you know, obviously the prices they have to pay for gas as well. But that’s very cool. It’s amazing that, you know, less than 20 or so are in North Carolina. Like shipping is what you do.

Brett
It is.

Jeff
Wow. Do these customers, I mean, obviously, a lot of them don’t visit you to talk about it in person or look at the demos in person, right?

Brett
Yeah, it’s all online.

Jeff
Wow.

Brett
All online through Instagram, seeing the images. I do still try to talk to every customer, either before they make the purchase or after they make the purchase. It’s just part of how I want to run the business. I like to know the people buying the bikes, riding the bikes, and understand a little bit about them and keep that connection.

Jeff
That’s amazing. A thousand bikes in two years. I mean, that’s huge.

Brett
It’s crazy. We’ve been busy.

Jeff
Yeah, I believe it. And overwhelmed, I’m sure.

Brett
And we’re doing it out of, you know, Cornelius, North Carolina. No one knows we’re there. It’s this little secret, tucked away.

Jeff
Yeah, for the longest time the only reason I knew you were around the Bailey Road area was because I would see you out occasionally doing a test ride.

Brett
Oh, yeah.

Jeff
Zooming up and down Bailey Road real quick.

Brett
Shhh…

Jeff
So, that’s really cool. And then recently, I did notice a sign out there.

Brett
Oh, yeah.

Jeff
You’ve got some signage out there now.

Brett
That’s how most people in the area know of us, is they see us. We test ride every bike, we put four or five miles on each bike. And we buzz up and down Bailey Road in and around the Cornelius/Davidson area.

Jeff
Yeah. They’re unique. You know they’re different when you see someone riding them. Like, a first glance you’re like, oh, that’s a motorcycle, and then you’re like, wait, that’s something a little different, you know?

Brett
Yep.

Jeff
That’s really cool. I can’t wait to check them out in person and take one for a ride. That’ll be fun. We’ll have to get some video and some images for Instagram.

Brett
Absolutely.

Jeff
Brett, a question that I love to bring up. Actually, before I get to that, let me ask you one more question about Huck Cycles and your business journey. You’ve had unbelievable challenges for sure. Especially since you’re in the manufacturing, business, and design, but the supply chain, of course, and labor, we could talk about that all day long. What are some other, what’s another unique challenge that kind of stands out that you’ve had to face over the last two years outside of COVID? And supply and labor. What have been some, maybe one or two, unexpected challenges that you’ve had with this company, with this startup?

Brett
Oh, man, there’s a big list of the challenges over the last couple of years. So, you know, I spent my career in the marketing and brand world, right, working for brands and agencies, consulting. And historically, the role was always about driving awareness and driving sales. I had a very different problem that I didn’t quite know how to handle where I wasn’t having to go out and get customers. We couldn’t handle the amount of customers that were coming our way. By May of last year, we had already done the sales that we thought we were going to do for the year. By June/July I literally had to mark products out of stock on our website and stop selling because we knew we couldn’t keep up because the demand had outpaced the supply chain’s ability to get us product. And some of that was because I was funding out of my pocket. The first 12 months that I had Huck going, we were at 10, 12 people. I had a full-time job that I worked during the day, and I would go to Huck at night and pick up where the team left off and work nights and weekends. So, the self-funding was part of what was holding us back. In October of ’21, so just a few months ago, really, I decided it was time to take on investment. And I brought on an investment group out of Charlotte, Clairvoyant Ventures, and they helped infuse capital into the business, which helps us solve a lot of the issues that we had growing up over the last two years. We’re able to now buy more components than we have demand for currently, build bikes faster, build them in advance, and then when demand comes, we can fulfill the orders quickly. And when things like a barge get stuck in a canal and holds up delivery of parts for two months, right?

Jeff
I remember that.

Brett
You know, we’re not as affected. Even now, off the coast of California, where anything from overseas is imported, it’s still, you know, a mile-long of barges waiting to get in. And that impacts us greatly. And those impacts flow to the customers waiting for bikes. So, having the increased buying power has helped us deal with that a lot better. The one unexpected thing that I think has caught me off guard and makes it very difficult for any small business or any business in general, is the tariffs and taxing. You know, we had components that were supposed to be coming in at a 3% tariff, and then the laws change while everything’s being imported. And it now becomes a 25 to 27% tariff. Well, we’ve already sold the bikes to customers and now we have to take, as a business, a small business, a 25% hit. And there’s nothing we could do about it. So, there are things like that that I think surprise you. But you work through it. It’s all you can do, right?

Jeff
And margins, I’m sure aren’t 90%. Like a 25% hit it, yeah, it could be the margin.

Brett
That’s the margin, yeah. And I mean, we went, starting a small business is not always the roses and sunshine and rainbows that everyone expects is, right? We went three, four months last year where we couldn’t get the parts because they were stuck at customs. And we continued to pay salaries for four months out of pocket. So, there’s, a lot that comes with being a small business owner, but it’s behind the scenes.

Jeff
Yeah, absolutely. Yeah, we talk about that a lot on the podcast, how it’s, you know, it seems so easy outside looking in, right, you know. But I can honestly say after 10 years, or 11 years of self-employment that in reality, it’s a lot easier to punch a clock and work for someone else. I mean, it’s just, you know, if you’re a lot of folks, there’s a lot of, it seems very, it’s en vogue to become a small business owner, to be self-employed. But, man, it takes a lot out of you. And it’s risky.

Brett
I went from an eight-hour corporate job as an executive at a financial institution to, you know, a self-employed, 16, 18 hour a day, you know, worker, and that’s still true today, going into three years where I’m still 14 to 16 hours a day, six days a week, usually, yeah.

Jeff
The passion and the love for the work and your business and the product helps drive you. But at some point, you know, at some point, you have to, like a business owner it’s not sustainable. Like, you have to be able to have the team in place that can, you know, and the process and everything.

Brett
And I see things getting better. A lot of what has been driving the long hours, the late nights, the additional work is the stuff that has surrounded the pandemic. Right, and the stuff that is surrounded the shortages of drivers and supply chain issues. Those are, we’re starting to see those get better. There’s better opportunities, and that’s lessening the need to be so involved and working so much. But again, at the end of the day when you come in and do a demo ride, and I see you come back in, and as you’re pulling up the smile on your face is worth it. It really is. It’s worth it to me.

Jeff
Yeah, absolutely. I love that. Thank you for sharing that. You started out self-financed?

Brett
Yes.

Jeff
Yeah. And obviously,

Brett
Thank you to my wife for allowing me to self-finance the startup.

Jeff
Yeah. Awesome that you’ve reached a point so quickly that you just couldn’t keep up with demand. But the concept was proven pretty quickly, right? You had orders, plenty of orders, and it makes sense that venture capital would want to get involved, so that’s awesome. Congratulations there.

Brett
Thank you.

Jeff
Very, very cool. We’ve reached a point in this conversation where in every episode I love to give shout outs to local small businesses. These could be small businesses that have been great partners for Huck Cycles or just local Lake Norman small businesses that you and Greta love, and your family love. What, of course, we want to give a shout out to the Bungalow Market.

Brett
I have to have the Bungalow Market on my list, absolutely.

Jeff
Yep. Who else do you have for me?

Brett
Yeah. You know, you mentioned them few times, Davidson Provision Company. Matt, a close friend, but I love what they’ve done with the shop that he’s got here. Davidson needed something like that, the area needed something like that.

Jeff
I agree.

Brett
So, I love what he’s done. You know, I think The Crazy Pig, I don’t know if you’ve been there.

Jeff
I haven’t. I need to.

Brett
You should, it’s fantastic. He started his business around the same time that we did. And you know, then COVID hit. And as a restaurant starting up within months of a pandemic could not have been an easy thing. Great people, great food, great service. So, Crazy Pig would be at the top of the list there. And well not a small business, I think they’ve done a lot for us, and they do a lot for our area, I think I want to recognize the parks and recreation folks for Lake Norman area. So, Huntersville, Cornelius, Davidson. The trail system that allows people to get out on the bikes and, you know, ride, and just walk and explore. All the events that they’re doing. We’re going to some parks and rec events. So, that gives us an opportunity to show local people our bikes. So, I think a big shout out to them.

Jeff
Yeah, I love that. I love that shout out. I appreciate that as well. I love the area’s parks and recs department and the improvements that they’ve been making over the last several years have been tremendous.

Brett
They’re huge.

Jeff
Yeah, it’s been really, really amazing. The Bungalow Market, of course, Greta, Davidson Provision Company, Matt Santos, both featured on the podcast in previous episodes, I’ll have links in the show notes. Both awesome conversations. And definitely recommend listeners go back if you haven’t already listened to those, to have a listen. The Crazy Pig has been recommended before. I pass it every day. And I just don’t, it’s so hard to find time to stop somewhere and have lunch. We are writing an article for the blog, I call it the blog, our website. And we love to feature food and beverage articles. Ten best lists and that sort of thing. And in fact, we did a 25 best list recently because I could have 100 best lists of everything, there’s so many great places, but we’re writing one on local barbecue restaurants. Crazy Pig is on that list.

Brett
Great. Try the wings. Their smoked wings are amazing.

Jeff
Are they amazing? I’ll definitely check that out. I heard something about the owner of The Crazy Pig. Was he, did he come from another restaurant?

Brett
I’m not sure, he must have.

Jeff
I need to reach out. There was a story there and I can’t remember what it was. So, I need to reach out and have a talk with them and maybe get them on the podcast because I don’t want to speculate. I want to make sure my facts are straight. But I’ll stop and soon and check them out and have lunch or dinner and share some stuff on Insta and on our website. Brett, this has been really cool. I appreciate you joining the podcast. I can’t wait to stop by the shop. In fact, it might be this Saturday. This Saturday might be one of those rare Saturdays where I don’t have any appointments. I’ll have to double check, but if not, it’ll be a Saturday soon.

Brett
Yeah, come on by, I’ll be there tomorrow.

Jeff
And I’ll definitely check that out. Can you share where you’re located on Bailey Road?

Brett
So, we’re, gosh, the best way to say would be next to the funky blue building. Right when you turn on Bailey Road, past the gas station.

Jeff
Yeah, yeah, I think it’s like 3D Capture.

Brett
The 3D Capture, we’re in the building right next to that. You’ll see the Huck signs. Yeah. Or as everyone knows, we’re across from the gun range.

Jeff
Yeah.

Brett
Everyone knows the gun range.

Jeff
The Range at Lake Norman, yeah. And where else? What’s the website and Instagram? Share that again for me.

Brett
So, we are at huckcycles.com or @huckcycles on Instagram.

Jeff
The Instagram’s amazing. Definitely recommend listeners check the Instagram out and follow Huck Cycles on Instagram. Brett McCoy, the founder of Huck Cycles. Brett, again, man, thanks so much for joining the podcast.

Brett
This was great. I appreciate it. Thank you.

Jeff
Now that’s a cool story. Huge thanks to Brett McCoy for joining the podcast. Friends, you can learn more about Huck Cycles at huckcycles.com. And I highly recommend following them on Instagram @huckcycles. Check out their YouTube channel too. I’ll have those links along with the links to the local businesses Brett and I mentioned during our conversation in the show notes for this episode. As always, you can find the complete show notes for all of our episodes at the home for Lake Norman’s number one small business podcast and online resource www.thebestoflkn.com. While you’re there, consider signing up for our weekly email newsletter. It’s free, easy to sign up, and a great way to stay up to date on all of our latest content. Don’t worry, we’ll never spam your inbox, and you can unsubscribe anytime, which you won’t do because it’s a good newsletter. Sodoma Law North is a sponsor that pays for the written transcriptions for each episode. So, a big thanks to that amazing team. The written transcriptions make the podcast accessible to everyone, including the hearing impaired, and we appreciate Sodoma Law North for supporting us in that effort. We love all of our sponsors. They’re all amazing local small businesses that are at the top of their game. They’re also just really good people. I hope you’ll learn more about them. You can find links on our homepage and in the show notes. Friends, that’s going to do it for Episode 105. Thanks for joining us each week and getting to know some of the coolest entrepreneurs in the Lake Norman area. We’ll be back next week of course with another episode, same time, same place. So, until then, cheers Lake Norman. Bye for now.

Narrator
We hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of The Best of LKN. For more information about this podcast, show notes, video episodes, and links to our feature businesses, please visit www.thebestoflkn.com. We publish episodes weekly, so be sure to subscribe and stay up to date. Until next time, cheers Lake Norman.